Distinguished Professor of Physics College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Over the past 30 years, Juan Carlos Campuzano, PhD, has built a distinguished career as an outstanding scientist. An accomplished researcher, Dr. Campuzano has made significant contributions to the science of high-temperature
superconductors and to the phenomenon of photoemission spectroscopy. He is recognized as one of the two undisputed world leaders in the use of angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES), now universally recognized as one of the most powerful experimental tools used to probe novel materials.

Dr. Campuzano is the winner of the prestigious 2011 Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize and is recognized as one of the two undisputed world leaders in the use of angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES), now universally recognized as one of the most powerful experimental tools used to probe novel materials.

Describing his research, Dr. Campuzano said, “The materials my students and I are studying now are the high-temperature superconductors. Although these have many potential transformative applications, from contributing solutions to the energy problem to medical diagnosis, we concentrate on their fundamental properties.”

“The area of physics related to materials is called condensed matter physics,” he said. “Most materials in use today are well understood and described in textbooks used in the classroom. Our experiments show that the high-temperature superconductors do not follow any of the known rules.”

As a testament to the extent of his scientific impact, it should be noted that his research publications (numbering more than 80) have been cited in the literature over 6,000 times, and at one point, his first paper on the pseudogap in hightemperature superconductors (published in 1996 in the journal Nature) was the most highly cited paper in all of physics.

Born and raised in Asuncion, Paraguay, he joined the faculty in the UIC Department of Physics in 1985, where he has remained ever since. In 1987, Dr. Campuzano also joined Argonne National Laboratory as a physicist in the Materials Science Division; he became a senior physicist 12 years later. He says once he and his wife decided to return to the United States to raise a family, he applied to several places. “It was excruciatingly difficult to decide where to go. Just then, the BBC aired a wonderful series with Studs Terkel lovingly talking about the wonders of Chicago. He made the decision for us. Chicago is a wonderful place to live.”